Introducing Your Child To Guns The Right Way: Part 2

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Click here for Part One of this article. Then, we’ll pick back up right where we left off. 

Go Rifle, Not Pistol:

Why a rifle instead of a pistol? Well, learning proper firearms techniques is easier to do with a small-caliber rifle. The sights are spaced further apart from each other making the gun more accurate, and, thus, boosting confidence.

In other words, rifles are just easier to learn with when first starting out.

Speaking of sights, you may be wondering what my thoughts are about putting on optic on your child’s rifle. Look, it is a total disservice to your child should you decide to train him/her how to shoot using an optic before using the steel sights the rifle comes with.

Furthermore, if you have never used open sights before, now’s the time to start. Dare I say that you may not really know how to shoot yet? Of course, this isn’t true for everyone, but most shooters use the optic as a crutch to be a better shot and that is never a good idea. Both you and your child need to learn on sights, first, then move to an optic.
It shouldn’t be done the other way around.

How To Store This Gun:

Kids have a burning desire to play with stuff. It doesn’t matter how much you train a kid, that part will not leave until they are old enough to fully understand the dangers associated with pointing a gun at someone. Different children will understand this at different times.
Case in point: My two girls learned at a young age that running out into the street is bad. I did my job as their father to teach them that they could die if they got hit by a car.
 


I teach my son the same (and even different) things, and he, for some reason, just does not get it. Every so often, he tries to dart out into the street. I actually hold onto him with an iron fist, just to prevent it.
Now, my little boy is smart. His vocabulary is huge for his age, and can already spell his name. He just turned three. But, for some reason, he still tries to run into oncoming traffic.
His sisters had this down by now, and we’ve tried everything we could think of to turn him off of it.
What’s the point behind telling you my parenting woes? All children learn at different rates. What one may be ready for, another may not be. When it comes to storing your child’s firearm, make sure it is in a spot where it can’t be played with. We all understand that guns are not toys. Children need to understand that, too.


Guns are not toys; but tools.

Tools used in bringing home food, self-defense, and to make a living (if you’re that good!).

But, while you need to make sure that your child understands that it isn’t a toy and only has access to his/her gun when you’re around, you need to make sure that he has enough time with it to learn its ins and outs to become proficient with it.

Becoming proficient in firearms is necessary for when your child grows up and leaves the house.

When will the child be ready? Only you can decide that, based on what you’ve seen with how he/she handles the firearm in your presence.

Does the kid live by the four safety rules? Does the kid clean the gun by him/herself? How often have you taken your kid to the range?
One thing that I’m striving for, is the ability to make sure that my kids can use a firearm, should they ever need to protect themselves with one. That should likely be your end goal, too.
Knowing when to teach your child when to shoot isn’t always an easy answer. However, if you follow what I’ve pointed out in this short, two part guide, you’ll have a good idea of what the first and next steps are.
Now, go get your child a .22 and have fun shooting together as you build lifelong memories.

Sound Off Gun Carriers! Did you buy your child his or her first gun yet? If so, at what age and what was the gun? Let us know in the comments below. Then, make sure you sign up for Gun Carrier’s FREE Newsletter.

2 Responses to :
Introducing Your Child To Guns The Right Way: Part 2

  1. Wynn says:

    THIS IS THE REASON I LOVE GLOCKS, AMONG OTHERS, THAT ARE SEMI-AUTOS.
    THEY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN TO DIFFICULT FOR MY YOUNG CHILDREN TO CHAMBER A ROUND. BY THE TIME THEY ARE STRONG ENOUGH, WE HAVE HAD SOME DECENT TRAINING ABOUT GUNS PHYSICALLY AND PHILOSOPHICALLY.

  2. Sheldon says:

    Thumbs up on starting with a rifle. I’m an NRA instructor and always start kids with a .22 rifle, at a bench, seated, and I make sure there is only one round in the gun at a time.

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