Highly Restrictive & Vague Firearms Bill now in Effect in Hawaii

Hawaii Firearms Bill: Highly Restrictive & Vague For Gun Owners

It doesn’t get any easier for gun owners and those who want to buy guns in Hawaii. There are two new Hawaii Firearms bills that are just as vague and restrictive as the ones before it.

New Hawaii Firearms Bills: What We Know About It

Hawaii is already well-known as one of the most anti-gun states in the U.S.

They rank #48 on Guns and Ammo’s annual “Best States for Gun Owners” list.

Now, Governor Ige has passed two more restrictive bills into law.

Gov. Ige signed SB 3054, and HB 2744 went into law without his signature, due to his failure to veto the measure.

House Bill 2744

House Bill 2744 “establishes the gun violence and violent crimes commission. Requires reports to the Legislature. Makes it a class C felony to purchase, manufacture, or otherwise obtain firearm parts for the purpose of assembling a firearm having no serial number. Amends certain requirements relating to firearms registration.”

The language is vague and overly broad, with felony penalties for violations.

It fails to recognize that prohibited persons cannot lawfully possess any firearm, whether home built or produced by a licensed manufacturer.

Additionally, the bill uses your tax dollars to create a commission to research “gun violence.”

Senate Bill 3054 SD2

Senate Bill 3054 SD 2 requires notice of permanent removal of a firearm outside the state, with the registering county, within five days.

Gun Owners Handbook

A penalty of $100 per firearm will be assessed for non-compliance.

The bills came out of a Hawaii legislative session that ended on July 10.

This session saw dozens of anti-gun bills introduced, with 18 being heard in a single week back in February.

Only 10 minutes were allotted to hear and decide upon five bills.

Upon adjournment of the session, many of the proposals were delayed.

Bills Junked!

Bills Junked! | New Hawaii Firearms Bills: Highly Restrictive & Vague For Gun Owners

House Bill 1902 and Senate Bill 2635 SD 2 were defeated.

House Bill 1902 prohibits the manufacture, possession, sale, barter, trade, gift, transfer, or acquisition of magazines capable of holding more than ten rounds.

Possession of magazines acquired prior to the ban will remain legal but will be prohibited from any transfer other than inheritance.

Senate Bill 2635 SD 2 requires anyone purchasing ammunition to provide proof of firearm registration for the particular caliber of purchase.

The owner of a firearm may also designate an alternate person who, after fingerprinting and a background check, will be issued a permit to purchase ammunition for that firearm.

In the case of firearms capable of firing multiple calibers, the bill leaves the decision to include any additional calibers up to the discretion of the police, with no outlined process for appeal.

Hawaii Has Yet to Decide

Hawaii will later decide on bills that:

  • Criminalize an individual for possession of a loaded firearm on their own property after consuming any alcohol. This bill does not even include a self-defense exception.
  • Remove the ban on electric stun guns in accordance with court precedent, but subjects these important tools of self-defense to excessive red tape and regulations.
  • Make changes to Hawaii’s concealed carry permit statute, authorizing the Attorney General to issue statewide permits, in addition to changing the point of payment from when a license is granted to when an application is submitted and increasing the cost by tenfold.
  • Prohibit possession of magazines capable of holding more than ten rounds. It contains no “grandfathering” provision for magazines lawfully acquired prior to the ban, so citizens will be forced to dispose of their property, alter it, or surrender it to the government.
  • Restrict ammunition purchases and possession to those who provide proof of firearm registration for the particular caliber of purchase. Additionally, the legislation requires licensing for ammunition sellers.
  • Ban “fifty caliber guns.”
  • Require the chief of police to attest that a review of an individual’s mental health records had been completed prior to the issuance of a firearm permit.
  • Repeal the temporary loan provisions for firearms.
  • Expand the ability to prohibit categories for firearm ownership by requiring medical documentation that an individual is no longer adversely affected by behavioral, emotional, or mental disorders as a minor.
  • Impose additional red tape regarding the closure of estates that include firearms. This insensitive legislation places a further burden on loved ones during their time of loss.
  • Remove Fourth Amendment rights from individuals of certain court orders by broadening the circumstances in which law enforcement can conduct warrantless searches.

It’s not looking good for Hawaii gun owners or aspiring gun owners. What do you think about these restrictive Hawaii Firearms bills? Let us know in the comments section!

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3 Responses to :
Highly Restrictive & Vague Firearms Bill now in Effect in Hawaii

  1. Richard Parker says:

    That is sad that’s what is going on there Glad I live in Texas

    1. Steve D says:

      Don’t think Texas won’t be in the future. The state is already purple.

  2. Ari Nietsnesie says:

    I used to live in New York, (NYC, to be specific), and got out of there to live in New Jersey.
    NJ has become almost as bad, and I can’t get out of here fast enough.
    A long time ago, I wanted to live in California, but now I don’t even want to change planes there.
    Now I have to add Hawaii to the list of states I don’t want to even set foot in !!!!

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